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THE MINER'S PRAYER COLLECTION BY GLAMOURBILLY

Each piece of jewelry in the Miner's Prayer line is one-of-a-kind, just like the ladies who wear them.  It is my sincere wish that each piece of scrip jewelry becomes a reminder of a close relationship, a cherished location, and a way of life that fades further into the past with each passing day.

The pieces you see below are samples from the Miner's Prayer line.  For orders, press inquiries, or to learn more please contact shannon@glamourbilly.com

Lyburn Mines  |  Lyburn, West Virginia

The Lyburn Mines scrip necklace features an elegant vintage rhinestone brooch along with a piece of coal scrip from the Lyburn Mines.  A tassel of dove gray silk hangs beneath the scrip. The long silver tone chain is accented with gold tone and vintage crystal beads.

Ruckman Store Co.  |  Providence, Kentucky

The Ruckman Stores scrip necklace feautres a dazzling vintage brooch of aurora borealis crystals along with a piece of copper colored scrip from Ruckman Stores.  A vintage ladies pocket knife hangs beneath the scrip.  The chain is made of copper colored links accented by freshwater pearls.

Koppers Stores  |  Kopperston, West Virginia

The Koppers Stores scrip necklace features a brilliant round vintage brooch paired with a piece of coal scrip from Koppers Stores Div.  It rests on an asymmetrical chain with deep purple agate stones and brass links.  The top of the chain features a vintage Mother Mary pendant acquired in Italy.

THE STORY BEHIND MINER'S PRAYER

I grew up in southern West Virginia in a tiny town where coal mining was a way of life for just about every family in the region.  Both of my grandfathers and a number of my uncles were miners.  I remember the lunch buckets they carried, their lighted hats, their steel-toed work boots, and the way they looked when they came home from the mines...completely exhausted and covered in coal dust from head to toe.

When I started making jewelry I began looking for unique items to put on my necklaces.  About 99% of Glamourbilly jewelry contains some sort of vintage object, and eventually I found a piece of coal scrip from Powellton Coal in Christian, West Virginia, the town where I lived until age nine.  I went to work right away to make a necklace for myself.  

As time went by, I started to acquire other pieces of scrip from West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee to make pieces for ladies who want to honor their heritage as part of the mining industry.  The use of coal scrip was ended in the 1950s.  And as many of us know, today's mining industry is vanishing before our eyes and threatening to take the rural lifestyle many love along with it.

Each piece of coal scrip jewelry in the Miner's Prayer line is one-of-a-kind.  Those who have purchased pieces from this line describe them as deeply personal and profoundly emotional because they remind the wearer of a father, grandfather, uncle or friend who made a living and supported their families by working in the coalmines. 

HOW TO BUY

To purchase Miner's Prayer you can visit Glamourbilly's Etsy shop to see what is available right now.  You can also request a custom piece using coal scrip coins that we have on hand, or that you already own.  Please send a message to shannon@glamourbilly.com to request a custom order. 

How to Buy Miner's Prayer Jewelry

Please visit Glamourbilly's Etsy shop to see what is available for purchase right now.

You can also request a custom piece using scrip coins that we have on hand, or that you already own.  Please send a message to shannon@glamourbilly.com to to request a custom order. 


What is Coal Scrip?
Coal scrip coins were used as a form of payment a coal company would issue to it's mine workers instead of cash.  The scrip could only be used to buy goods (food, clothes, tools, supplies) at the company store owned by the mine where you worked. Being paid in scrip instead of cash put miners at a disadvantage because it couldn't be saved, invested, or spent elsewhere. The use of scrip was ended in the 1950s. You can read more about Appalachian history and coal scrip here.